Mending Nets

Home Photography Forums The Shark Tank Mending Nets

This topic contains 10 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Kent DuFault 2 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #394360

    Erik Fransman
    Participant

    Fisherman Mending his nets. There are serveral white spots on his clothes and face. I left them because they are chips that jumped from the net he is working on.
    Fujifilm X-T3, 1/100s, f/1.4, 56mm, ISO 160
    Please click for Flickr:
    Fishermen Mending his nets, Urk The Netherlands

  • #394397

    Kent DuFault
    Participant

    I like the subject matter and the use of monochrome. I find the forklift in the background very distracting. I wonder if there might have been a better angle?

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  Kent DuFault.
  • #394400

    Richard Barnard
    Participant

    Unfortunately, as the brightest highlight area my eyes are immediately drawn to the clipped whites of the net and some of the background details. The fisherman appears rather ‘dark’ and muted in comparison with shadowing to the face. The whites of the eyes in particular have become lost in the shadow of the eye sockets but could be recoverable with a different edit. (I will leave this to fellow sharks with more expertise than I).

    I think this would be a stronger portrait with a cleaner background. As it is there are a number of distractions, notably the bright horizontal line exiting his back, the right angle highlight from shoulder to just above the eye line and the partially obscured forklift. As previously mentioned there are also some areas of background clipping top right of frame.

    Interesting character but a case of needing to start with the background and then work forward when composing the shot.

  • #394481

    billyspad
    Participant

    I'm pretty confident had there been a better angle you would have used it so its just making the best of what you had. Had it been an old wooden boat in the background it would be seen as context and OK but a fork truck poses other problems. Can you maybe make the background lighter with more blur on the offending item?

  • #394486

    Erik Fransman
    Participant

    Thanks for commenting. I agree about the forklift. It was a difficult location and it was not a portrait shoot. I was on a recce, saw him at work, decided on an f/1.2 or f/1.4 aperture to get the most bokeh and snapped. That is no excuse, it is just how it was.

    Here is another angle I tried. f/1.2

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  Erik Fransman.
  • #394489

    Gary Zerbst
    Participant

    Of the two shots presented,  I prefer No. 2.  It has less background distractions than does No.1 . (Less is more?)  The worker's  line of sight, (an implied leading line),  and the leading line of the repair rope from his hand to the net,  both lead the viewer's eyes to the work, which I take to be the subject of this photo.   I don't know  if it would have been achievable but a little more blurring of the  background without losing the sparse DOF of the net might have helped this photo.   The bright white rectangles under the man's right arm snag my eye and could be removed in post without too much difficulty .  I like the idea and the basic composition but IMHO and with 20-20 hindsight the photo could have been improved

  • #394541

    Richard Barnard
    Participant

    I think this is a much stronger shot and works well in a tight, simplified, square format. I like the direction of gaze towards the net and the line provides a nice diagonal into frame. A more natural shot overall with fewer distractions although the bright highlights underneath his arm need to be cloned out. Exposure is much stronger and I like that we can see the details on his face.

     

  • #394607

    Federico Alegria
    Participant

    Hi there @erik-fransman, for me the second shot is better due to its candidness. Maybe a wider crop could feel less constrained, and maybe you could pull of some details from the shadows if his clothes. Other than that, this is a good one. I must say, you could start doing a small essay about this sort of manual work.

  • #394613

    Erik Fransman
    Participant

    Thanks Richard.
    Frederico, here's a wider version, below one more in org color.

     

  • #394857

    Kent DuFault
    Participant

    I prefer the 2nd b&w that you posted out of all the versions.

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