Fuji Has Big Plans for the Digital Medium Format

Share: 

There hasn’t been a lot of talk about the future these past several weeks in terms of products in development and what companies are planning in terms of development roadmaps.

Image via Fujifilm.

That’s probably why this news from Fuji concerning their digital medium format cameras is so heartening. It’s a short break where we get to look ahead and debate whether or not Fuji’s plans are pipedreams or a true vision for the future.

In a recent interview with cinema5D, Fuji’s General Manager Toshi Iida sees a bright future ahead for the for the GFX lineup, and, for fans of that model, his predictions probably come as no surprise. Basically, he sees the GFX becoming more integral to Fuji’s lineup and offering more power and capabilities at the same time.

An excerpt from the interview about this topic reads in part:

“cinema5D:…full-frame cameras are kind of dropping in price. And they’re doing quite a good job. Do you think in the future you will be able to also bring the price down of a medium format and accommodate the needs of filmmakers, something that is a bit more cost-effective and that can compete also price-wise with [full-frame] cameras?

Toshi Iida: Of course we’re fully aware about our competition. And we already started doing GFX50 at a very attractive price point already, but the response is great. So it’s always our ambition to make the GFX a mainstream product. To make the GFX a mainstream product we need to continue our effort to make it more affordable and probably smaller and lighter. So this is one way we’re focusing on.”

What do you think of Fuji’s plans for the digital medium format? Well-reasoned or somewhat bold given market conditions? Let us know your thoughts on this in the comments section below if you like. We love to hear from you.

And don’t forget to check out all of our other photography news articles here on Light Stalking by clicking this link here.

[PetaPixel]

What We Recommend to Improve Your Photography Fast

It's possible to get some pretty large improvements in your photography skills very fast be learning some fundamentals. Consider this the 80:20 rule of photography where 80% of the improvements will come from 20% of the learnable skills. Those fundamentals include camera craft, composition, understanding light and mastering post-production. Here are the premium guides we recommend.

  1. html cleaner  Easy DSLR –  Friend of Light Stalking, Ken Schultz has developed this course over several years and it still remains the single best source for mastering your camera by identifying the main things that are holding you back.
  2. Word to html  Understanding Composition – As one of the core elements of a good photograph, getting your head around composition is essential. Photzy's guide to the subject is an excellent introduction. Their follow-up on Advanced Composition is also well worth a read.
  3. Word to html  Understanding Light – Also by Photzy, the other essential part of photography is covered in this epic guide and followed up in Understanding Light, Part 2. This is fundamental stuff that every photographer should aim to master.
  4. Word to html  5 Minute Magic Lightroom Workflow – Understanding post production is one of the keys to photographs that you will be proud of. This short course by one of the best in the business will show you how an award-winning photographer does it.

About Author

Kehl is our staff photography news writer and has over a decade of experience in online media and publishing and you can get to know him better here

The GFX is slightly bigger than 35 mm. Does that make it medium format? Also by cramming twice as many pixels in the same footprint as the 50 they actually lost dynamic range. Hasselblad and Phase one have sensors approaching 120 film and 15 stops of dynamic range. Maybe the Leica S3. But that’s it in the digital MF world.

Agreed it is not a true medium format but is medium format even a thing unless one side is 60mm? I’d kill for a 6×7 sensor. I can’t see the dynamic range issues in the outcome of my work on a GFX compared to my Pentax K1. If the outcome is not visually appealing to you that is one thing but I was never one to care about spec sheets as a measure of worth.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *