These Haunting 1913 Portraits Are From the Beginnings of Colour Photography

Thanks to the folks at The National Media Museum these amazing photographs by Mervyn O’Gorman have been getting a lot of attention lately. Taken at Dorset in 1913, these photographs of his daughter show us some wonderful versions of the Autochrome Lumière process.

Autochrome Lumière was a process for colour photography invented in France in 1903, marketed in 1907 and which dominated colour photography until the mid 1930s.

O'Gorman himself was an engineer with a very prevalent photography habit which has meant that many of his photographs are often included in exhibitions of early colour photography. For anyone curious about photography's history, these certainly are a wonderful discovery.

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via: The National Media Museum and Bored Panda.


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Rob is the founder of Light Stalking which is one of the most shared photography sites online. He is also co-founder of Photzy. You can find him on Twitter, Facebook, and mail as well.

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