These Haunting 1913 Portraits Are From the Beginnings of Colour Photography | Light Stalking

These Haunting 1913 Portraits Are From the Beginnings of Colour Photography

Thanks to the folks at The National Media Museum these amazing photographs by Mervyn O’Gorman have been getting a lot of attention lately. Taken at Dorset in 1913, these photographs of his daughter show us some wonderful versions of the Autochrome Lumière process.
Autochrome Lumière was a process for colour photography invented in France in 1903, marketed in 1907 and which dominated colour photography until the mid 1930s.
O'Gorman himself was an engineer with a very prevalent photography habit which has meant that many of his photographs are often included in exhibitions of early colour photography. For anyone curious about photography's history, these certainly are a wonderful discovery.
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via: The National Media Museum and Bored Panda.

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Rob Wood (Admin)

Rob is the founder of Light Stalking. His love for photography pushed him into building this fantastic place, and you can get to know him better here

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