The Pale Chanting Goshawk

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This topic contains 27 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  Tobie 4 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #315864

    Tobie
    Moderator

    The Pale Chanting Goshawk is quite common in our South African reserves. It is quite an interesting raptor, hunting for its prey not only from the air but also on the ground. Its most characteristic perch is at the highest point of a tree where it waits for any movement of small prey on the ground below.

    Most birds go through various stages of transformation until adulthood and this one is no exception. In fact, if one does not know any better, you would think that each phase of this bird's transformation is from a different species. One of the reasons being that it is fully grown before the first transformation occurs.

    The juvenile phase:

    CTS_9500P-CG

     

    The Sub-adult phase:

    CTS_9304-PCG

     

    The adult phase:

    CTS_9628-PCG

    • This topic was modified 4 months, 2 weeks ago by  Tobie.
  • #315897

    John Thompson
    Moderator

    Again WOW!

    • #315970

      Tobie
      Moderator

      πŸ™‚

  • #315898

    Frogdaily
    Participant

    Stunning detail!

    • #315971

      Tobie
      Moderator

      Thanks Frog's!

  • #315912

    Kent DuFault
    Participant

    Very nice Tobie. Boy, that adult looks like it's ready to peck somebody's eyeball out.

    • #315967

      Tobie
      Moderator

      Thanks Kent! These birds are in fact fearless. On one of our trips I saw a juvenile taking on (with caution) a full-grown sun-basking Cape Cobra. The cobra lifted its head in attacking mode for a moment, then realized that this bird is not going to back down and fled into a thick bush close by (if not for the bush, thing would have gotten very interesting!).

      Unfortunately I was just too late to take a nice action shot and only caught the last part of the snake disappearing into the bush. I have cropped out the snake & tree part here, but look at this attitude as it was watching the snake on the flee. After this it flew up to the top of the bush and kept on searching for the snake:

      CTS_8740-PCG

  • #315926

    Mistyisle
    Participant

    Great stuff, Tobie!Β  Reminds me of prize fighters ready for action, with such muscular showing.

    • #315968

      Tobie
      Moderator

      Thanks Misty!

  • #315929

    Cindy Mulvihill
    Participant

    Great photos Tobie, love the adult.

    • #315969

      Tobie
      Moderator

      Thanks Cindy! Yea they are beautiful indeed!

  • #315988

    Dahlia Ambrose
    Keymaster

    Wow, what a huge contrast between the juvenile and adult phase. Looks very majestic and beautiful set of images Tobie. I like how you have captured the colours and contrast in these images (Were they shot in midday?) although the light is very bright and their colours seem to match the colours in the background (especially with the lion images and the juvenile hawk above looking for the cobra)

    Learning a lot from your wildlife images; very interesting and loving it πŸ™‚

    • #316003

      Tobie
      Moderator

      Thanks so much Dahlia! The northern Cape up to the Kalahari desert where these shots were taken is extremely dry at the moment, not having had rain for many years. This is evident in all of my ground shots and obviously suits the color of the lions. If they lie down in the grasses a few feet from you, you wouldn't know that they're there (as if they need any help to disappear)!

      Most lion shots were taken early morning (up to about 9h00) and late afternoon (after 17h00). This poses interesting problems in PP as they look unnaturally yellow. I had to lower the saturation in the yellows on most of them. This is a shot where I have left the yellows alone but in this case I actually like it. The setting sun was just above the horizon and the lion walked into a ‘line' of sunshine:

      Lion sunshine

      • #316057

        Dahlia Ambrose
        Keymaster

        Wow, no rain for many years? So do the animals have spring water or any rivers passing by?

        I like the light in the above image Tobie. The colour also works well for the light condition. What an adventurous experience! πŸ™‚

        • #316077

          Tobie
          Moderator

          There are boreholes right next or in the river bed, Dahlia. Some of them have dried up but most are still producing water. The water tastes a little brackish, except for the camps not next to the river bed which produce proper brackish water – as salty as sea salt. The amazing thing is that these animals drink that salty water as it is all they have.

          It was a great experience indeed! Lions are always the optimum subject to see and we have seen them every day of our stay in the park. Someone up there must love us! πŸ™‚

          • #316154

            Dahlia Ambrose
            Keymaster

            Sad they have to drink salty water. Thanks for the information Tobie πŸ™‚

          • #316243

            Tobie
            Moderator

            True but I guess if that's all you have then you're not complaining Dahlia! πŸ˜‰

          • #316291

            Dahlia Ambrose
            Keymaster

            πŸ˜€

      • #316069

        Kent DuFault
        Participant

        LOVE this lion shot!!

        • #316079

          Tobie
          Moderator

          Thanks Kent! πŸ™‚

  • #316008

    ElinL
    Participant

    Stunning images Tobie !

    Bird photography is not that easy, you spot them and pst – they are gone. Or they sit high up, backlit or low behind bushes and trees where you canΒ΄t move in on them without disturbing.

    These days I am going through the bird images I took in Trinidad with aid of books and internet. Many of their local sp. go through morphological transitions as you describe above. Some of them are incredibly difficult to identify – but interesting and rewarding to study.

    • #316048

      Tobie
      Moderator

      Agreed Elin! To identify the females in some species with certainty is a ‘real' challenge and much more difficult than identifying the juveniles. Sometimes it's impossible so the only real ‘evidence' of who they belong to is to see them fly around with their male ‘partners'. A good example of this is our sunbirds. Most females look very close to this:

      sunbird female

  • #316300

    Tersha
    Keymaster

    Amazingly beautiful shots Tobie! We have a Goshawk here in the UK, but it doesn't change it's appearance like the one you've shown.

    • #316332

      Tobie
      Moderator

      Thanks @tersha! Take a shot of one and show us! πŸ˜‰

      • #316483

        Tersha
        Keymaster

        Tobie, this is from a few years back, in the garden ….

        goshawk02

        • #316543

          Tobie
          Moderator

          Beautiful bird! It reminds quite strongly of the juvenile version above, perhaps just a little more bulky.

  • #316303

    Ian c
    Participant

    Taken whilst on a day out a falconry centre  near glen eagles in Scotland uk.

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