Samsung Wants Global Dominance in the Imaging Sensor Business

Korean super conglomerate Samsung is often featured in the press for its amazing phones, many of which are considered the best smartphone models on the market today. Almost everything about them is spot on in terms of designs and functionality, and the company never shies away from cutting-edge technology.

But in its home country, and around the world Samsung manufactures everything from televisions to refrigerators, as well as optical equipment and component parts. Indeed, it is probably quite difficult to name a sector that Samsung does have some stake in whether it is construction or chemicals.

Currently, the imaging sensor business is dominated by Japan’s Sony, but Samsung wants to end that reign and establish themselves on top of the sector according to a report from The Phoblographer.

Image via Pixabay from Pexels.com.

The company is in the middle of an expansion of its imaging sensor production capacity in a purported bid to challenge Sony because Samsung execs feel their product is primed to take the lead.

While Samsung no longer manufactures its own line of cameras, it is anticipated that the new focus will be on mobile cameras and the like rather than dedicated models like the old Samsung NX1. To further bolster these reports, Sony and Samsung are the only two companies in the world to have “developed and commercialized a 3-stack imaging sensor design capable of processing 960 frames in a single second” according to The Phoblographer in what the site describes is a “two-horse race” between Samsung and Sony.

While it will probably be difficult to unseat Sony as it is the current market leader by a wide margin, the new Samsung development offers manufacturers a choice of what the company hopes will be a comparable product. In a test of the adage that competition improves everything, we expect the showdown between Samsung and Sony will be nothing be a benefit for the industry and large.


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About the author

Kehl Bayern

Kehl Bayern is a freelance writer and editor of Demagaga.


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