3 Free Guides for Perfect Black and White Photos

I could talk about Black and White Photography forever, for real, and today I want to share with you three free guides that will help you take better black and white photographs. And hopefully, I'm still on time for sharing them with you before you make mistakes as the ones I made in my first encounters with photography.

Black and White photography has always been very appealing to me, and since my first days as a photographer, I wanted to create jaw-dropping photographs that made people stop and stare in monochrome.

Photo by Elisabetta Foco on Unsplash

Color versus Black and White

Except for a couple of really expensive cameras since the appearance of digital cameras, black and white photography has been a thing that happens truly in post-production rather than in camera.

Therefore deciding whether a photograph should stay in color or if it could work better in black and white is a very good place to start if you want to make amazing photographs.

Here in this guide, Jason D. Little shares with us exactly that, how to decide whether a picture should be transformed into monochrome or whether it should be developed as a color photograph.

Street Photography Types

Street photography is one of those genres that works quite well in black and white. Not all street photographs look great in color because there is a huge lack of control of what is happening in front of our eyes, and that's why you'll see a lot of black and white images in Diane Wehr's freed guide on street photography.

Short Guide to Black and White Photography

Last but not least, one of the biggest treasures available for free at Photzy thanks to our friend Kent DuFault. Here you'll get a very interesting taste of what black and white photography is all about.

Photo by William Sura

Black and White photography is not a genre but a decision, and whatever you do, in post-production, you need to understand one thing. And that thing is that Black and White will always work better if there is an intention behind it, messages get delivered better in monochrome when the color versions are way too distracting.


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About the author

Federico Alegria

Federico is a one of our staff writers and has 8 years of experience in making documentary photography, he is currently working in long-term photo essays and you can watch more of his work here. He is also a photography educator at a design-focused University, and is currently pursuing his PhD (and of course, his thesis is around Photography). His work has been featured in museums, newspapers and magazines. He is currently based in El Salvador.

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